Handbook of Applied Cryptography - chap11

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Mô tả: This is a Chapter from the Handbook of Applied Cryptography, by A. Menezes, P. van Oorschot, and S. Vanstone, CRC Press, 1996. For further information, see www.cacr.math.uwaterloo.ca/hac CRC Press has granted the following specific permissions for the electronic version of this book: Permission is granted to retrieve, print and store a single copy of this chapter for personal use. This permission does not extend to binding multiple chapters of the book, photocopying or producing copies for other than personal use of the person creating the copy, or making electronic copies available for retrieval by others without prior permission in writing from CRC Press. Except where over-ridden by the specific permission above, the standard copyright notice from CRC Press applies to this electronic version: Neither this book nor any part may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, microfilming, and recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. The consent of CRC Press does not extend to copying for general distribution, for promotion, for creating new works, or for resale. Specific permission must be obtained in writing from CRC Press for such copying. c 1997 by CRC Press, Inc. Chapter 11 Digital Signatures Contents in Brief 11.1 Introduction .425 11.2 A framework for digital signature mechanisms 426 11.3 RSA and related signature schemes .433 11.4 Fiat-Shamir signature schemes .447 11.5 The DSA and related signature schemes 451 11.6 One-time digital signatures .462 11.7 Other signature schemes 471 11.8 Signatures with additional functionality 474 11.9 Notes and further references 481 11.1 Introduction This chapter considerstechniques designed to provide the digital counterpartto a handwrit- tensignature. A digitalsignatureof a messageis a numberdependenton somesecretknown only to the signer, and, additionally, on the content of the message being signed. Signatures must be verifiable; if a disputearises as to whether a party signed a document(caused by ei- ther a lying signer trying to repudiate a signature it did create, or a fraudulent claimant), an unbiased third party should be able to resolve the matter equitably,without requiring access to the signer’s secret information (private key). Digital signatures have many applications in information security, including authenti- cation, data integrity, and non-repudiation. One of the most significant applications of dig- ital signatures is the certification of public keys in large networks. Certification is a means for a trusted third party (TTP) to bind the identity of a user to a public key, so that at some later time, other entities can authenticate a public key without assistance from a trusted third party. The concept and utility of a digital signature was recognized several years before any practical realization was available. The first method discovered was the RSA signature sch- eme, which remains today one of the most practical and versatile techniques available. Sub- sequent research has resulted in many alternative digital signature techniques. Some offer significant advantages in terms of functionality and implementation. This chapter is an ac- count of many of the results obtained to date, with emphasis placed on those developments which are practical. 425 426 Ch. 11 Digital Signatures Chapter outline §11.2providesterminologyused throughoutthe chapter, and describesa framework for dig- ital signatures that permits a useful classification of the various schemes. It is more abstract than succeeding sections. §11.3 provides an indepth discussion of the RSA signature sch- eme, as well as closely related techniques. Standards which have been adopted to imple- ment RSA and related signature schemes are also considered here. §11.4 looks at meth- ods which arise from identification protocols described in Chapter 10. Techniques based on the intractability of the discrete logarithm problem, such as the Digital Signature Algo- rithm (DSA) and ElGamal schemes, are the topic of §11.5. One-time signature schemes, many of which arise from symmetric-key cryptography, are considered in §11.6. §11.7 de- scribes arbitrated digital signatures and the ESIGN signature scheme. Variations on the ba- sic concept of digital signatures, including blind, undeniable, and fail-stop signatures, are discussed in §11.8. Further notes, including subtle points on schemes documented in the chapter and variants (e.g., designated confirmer signatures, convertible undeniable signa- tures, group signatures, and electronic cash) may be found in §11.9. 11.2 A framework for digital signature mechanisms §1.6 provides a brief introduction to the basic ideas behind digital signatures, and §1.8.3 shows how these signatures can be realized through reversible public-key encryption tech- niques. This section describes two general models for digital signature schemes. A com- plete understanding of the material in this section is not necessary in order to follow sub- sequent sections; the reader unfamiliar with some of the more concrete methods such as RSA (§11.3) and ElGamal (§11.5) is well advised not to spend an undue amount of time. The idea of a redundancy function is necessary in order to understand the algorithms which give digital signatures with message recovery. The notation provided in Table 11.1 will be used throughout the chapter. 11.2.1 Basic definitions 1. A digital signature is a data string which associates a message (in digital form) with some originating entity. 2. A digital signature generation algorithm (or signature generation algorithm)isa method for producing a digital signature. 3. A digital signature verification algorithm (or verification algorithm) is a method for verifying that a digital signature is authentic (i.e., was indeed created by the specified entity). 4. A digital signature scheme (or mechanism) consists of a signature generation algo- rithm and an associated verification algorithm. 5. A digital signature signing process (or procedure) consists of a (mathematical) digi- tal signature generation algorithm, along with a method for formatting data into mes- sages which can be signed. 6. A digital signature verificationprocess (or procedure) consists of a verification algo- rithm, along with a method for recovering data from the message. 1 1 Often little distinction is made between the terms scheme and process, and they are used interchangeably. c 1997 by CRC Press, Inc. — See accompanying notice at front of chapter. § 11.2 A framework for digital signature mechanisms 427 This chapter is, for the most part, concerned simply with digital signature schemes. In order to use a digital signature scheme in practice, it is necessary to have a digital signature process. Several processes related to various schemes have emerged as commercially rele- vant standards; two such processes, namely ISO/IEC 9796 and PKCS #1, are described in §11.3.5and§11.3.6, respectively. Notation used in the remainder of this chapteris provided in Table 11.1. The sets and functions listed in Table 11.1 are all publicly known. Notation Meaning M a set of elements called the message space. M S a set of elements called the signing space. S a set of elements called the signature space. R a 1 − 1 mapping from M to M S called the redundancy function. M R the image of R (i.e., M R =Im(R)). R −1 theinverseofR (i.e., R −1 : M R −→ M). R a set of elements called the indexing set for signing. h a one-way function with domain M. M h the image of h (i.e., h: M−→M h ); M h ⊆M S called the hash value space. Table 11.1: Notation for digital signature mechanisms. 11.1 Note (comments on Table 11.1) (i) (messages) M is the set of elements to which a signer can affix a digital signature. (ii) (signing space) M S is the set of elements to which the signature transformations (to be described in §11.2.2 and §11.2.3) are applied. The signature transformations are not applied directly to the set M. (iii) (signature space) S is the set of elements associated to messages in M. These ele- ments are used to bind the signer to the message. (iv) (indexing set) R is used to identify specific signing transformations. A classification of digital signature schemes §11.2.2 and §11.2.3 describe two general classes of digital signature schemes, which can be briefly summarized as follows: 1. Digital signature schemes with appendix require the original message as input to the verification algorithm. (See Definition 11.3.) 2. Digital signature schemes with message recovery do not require the original message as input to the verification algorithm. In this case, the original message is recovered from the signature itself. (See Definition 11.7.) These classes can be further subdivided according to whether or not |R| =1, as noted in Definition 11.2. 11.2 Definition A digital signature scheme (with either message recovery or appendix) is said to be a randomized digital signature scheme if |R| > 1; otherwise, the digital signature scheme is said to be deterministic. Figure 11.1 illustrates this classification. Deterministic digital signature mechanisms can be further subdivided into one-time signature schemes (§11.6) and multiple-use schemes. Handbook of Applied Cryptography by A. Menezes, P. van Oorschot and S. Vanstone. 428 Ch. 11 Digital Signatures Digital signature schemes message recovery appendix Randomized Deterministic Randomized Deterministic Figure 11.1: A taxonomy of digital signature schemes. 11.2.2 Digital signature schemes with appendix Digital signature schemes with appendix, as discussed in this section, are the most com- monly used in practice. They rely on cryptographic hash functions rather than customized redundancy functions, and are less prone to existential forgery attacks (§11.2.4). 11.3 Definition Digital signature schemes which require the message as input to the verifica- tion algorithm are called digital signature schemes with appendix. Examples of mechanisms providing digital signatures with appendix are the DSA (§11.5.1), ElGamal (§11.5.2), and Schnorr (§11.5.3) signature schemes. Notation for the following discussion is given in Table 11.1. 11.4 Algorithm Key generation for digital signature schemes with appendix SUMMARY: each entity creates a private key for signing messages, and a corresponding public key to be used by other entities for verifying signatures. 1. Each entity A should select a private key which defines a set S A = {S A,k : k ∈R} of transformations. Each S A,k is a 1-1 mapping fromM h toS and is called a signing transformation. 2. S A defines a corresponding mapping V A from M h ×Sto {true, false} such that V A (m, s ∗ )=  true, if S A,k (m)=s ∗ , false, otherwise, for all m ∈M h , s ∗ ∈S; here, m = h(m) for m ∈M. V A is called a verification transformation and is constructed such that it may be computed without knowledge of the signer’s private key. 3. A’s public key is V A ; A’s private key is the set S A . c 1997 by CRC Press, Inc. — See accompanying notice at front of chapter. § 11.2 A framework for digital signature mechanisms 429 11.5 Algorithm Signaturegeneration and verification (digital signature schemes with appendix) SUMMARY: entity A produces a signature s ∈Sfor a message m ∈M, which can later be verified by any entity B. 1. Signature generation. Entity A should do the following: (a) Select an element k ∈R. (b) Compute m = h(m) and s ∗ = S A,k (m). (c) A’s signature for m is s ∗ .Bothm and s ∗ are made available to entities which may wish to verify the signature. 2. Verification. Entity B should do the following: (a) Obtain A’s authentic public key V A . (b) Compute m = h(m) and u = V A (m, s ∗ ). (c) Accept the signature if and only if u = true. Figure 11.2 provides a schematic overviewof a digital signature scheme with appendix. The following properties are required of the signing and verification transformations: (i) for each k ∈R, S A,k should be efficient to compute; (ii) V A should be efficient to compute; and (iii) it should be computationally infeasible for an entity other than A to find an m ∈M and an s ∗ ∈Ssuch that V A (m, s ∗ )=true, where m = h(m). V A true false M h ×S m m hS A,k MM h S s ∗ = S A,k (m) (a) The signing process (b) The verification process Figure 11.2: Overview of a digital signature scheme with appendix. 11.6 Note (use of hash functions) Most digital signature schemes with message recovery (§11.2.3) are applied to messages of a fixed length, while digital signatures with appendix are applied to messages of arbitrary length. The one-way function h in Algorithm 11.5 is Handbook of Applied Cryptography by A. Menezes, P. van Oorschot and S. Vanstone. 430 Ch. 11 Digital Signatures typically selected to be a collision-free hash function (see Definition 9.3). An alternative to hashing is to break the message into blocks of a fixed length which can be individually signed using a signature scheme with message recovery. Since signature generation is rel- atively slow for many schemes, and since reordering of multiple signed blocks presents a security risk, the preferred method is to hash. 11.2.3 Digital signature schemes with message recovery The digital signature schemes described in this section have the feature that the message signed can be recovered from the signature itself. In practice, this feature is of use for short messages (see §11.3.3(viii)). 11.7 Definition A digitalsignature scheme withmessagerecoveryis a digital signature scheme for which a priori knowledge of the message is not required for the verification algorithm. Examples of mechanisms providing digital signatures with message recovery are RSA (§11.3.1), Rabin (§11.3.4), and Nyberg-Rueppel (§11.5.4) public-key signature schemes. 11.8 Algorithm Key generation for digital signature schemes with message recovery SUMMARY: each entity creates a private key to be used for signing messages, and a cor- responding public key to be used by other entities for verifying signatures. 1. Each entity A should select a set S A = {S A,k : k ∈R}of transformations. Each S A,k is a 1-1 mapping from M S to S and is called a signing transformation. 2. S A defines a correspondingmapping V A with the property that V A ◦S A,k is the iden- tity map on M S for all k ∈R. V A is called a verification transformation and is constructed such that it may be computed without knowledge of the signer’s private key. 3. A’s public key is V A ; A’s private key is the set S A . 11.9 Algorithm Signature generation and verification for schemes with message recovery SUMMARY: entity A produces a signature s ∈Sfor a message m ∈M, which can later be verified by any entity B. The message m is recovered from s. 1. Signature generation. Entity A should do the following: (a) Select an element k ∈R. (b) Compute m = R(m) and s ∗ = S A,k (m).(R is a redundancy function; see Table 11.1 and Note 11.10.) (c) A’s signature is s ∗ ; this is made available to entities which may wish to verify the signature and recover m from it. 2. Verification. Entity B should do the following: (a) Obtain A’s authentic public key V A . (b) Compute m = V A (s ∗ ). (c) Verify that m ∈M R . (If m ∈ M R , then reject the signature.) (d) Recover m from m by computing R −1 (m). c 1997 by CRC Press, Inc. — See accompanying notice at front of chapter. § 11.2 A framework for digital signature mechanisms 431 R M m M R M S S A,k m s ∗ = S A,k (m) S Figure 11.3: Overview of a digital signature scheme with message recovery. Figure 11.3 provides a schematic overview of a digital signature scheme with message recovery. The following properties are required of the signing and verification transforma- tions: (i) for each k ∈R, S A,k should be efficient to compute; (ii) V A should be efficient to compute; and (iii) it should be computationally infeasible for an entity other than A to find any s ∗ ∈S such that V A (s ∗ ) ∈M R . 11.10 Note (redundancy function) The redundancy function R and its inverse R −1 are publicly known. Selecting an appropriate R is critical to the security of the system. To illustrate this point, suppose that M R = M S . Suppose R and S A,k are bijections from M to M R andM S to S, respectively. This implies that M and S have the same number of elements. Then for any s ∗ ∈S,V A (s ∗ ) ∈M R , and it is trivial to find messages m and corresponding signatures s ∗ whichwill be accepted by the verification algorithm (step 2 ofAlgorithm 11.9) as follows. 1. Select random k ∈Rand random s ∗ ∈S. 2. Compute m = V A (s ∗ ). 3. Compute m = R −1 (m). The element s ∗ is a valid signature for the message m and was created without knowledge of the set of signing transformationsS A . 11.11 Example (redundancy function) Suppose M = {m: m ∈{0, 1} n } for some fixed posi- tive integer n and M S = {t : t ∈{0, 1} 2n }.DefineR: M−→M S by R(m)=mm, where  denotes concatenation; that is, M R = {mm: m ∈M}⊆M S . For large val- ues of n, the quantity |M R |/|M S | =( 1 2 ) n is a negligibly small fraction. This redundancy function is suitable provided that no judicious choice of s ∗ on the part of an adversary will have a non-negligible probability of yielding V A (s ∗ ) ∈M R .  11.12 Remark (selectinga redundancyfunction)Even thoughtheredundancyfunctionR is pub- lic knowledge and R −1 is easy to compute, selection of R is critical and should not be made independently of the choice of the signing transformations in S A . Example 11.21 provides a specific example of a redundancy function which compromises the security of the signa- ture scheme. An example of a redundancy function which has been accepted as an inter- national standard is given in §11.3.5. This redundancy function is not appropriate for all digital signature schemes with message recovery, but does apply to the RSA (§11.3.1) and Rabin (§11.3.4) digital signature schemes. Handbook of Applied Cryptography by A. Menezes, P. van Oorschot and S. Vanstone. 432 Ch. 11 Digital Signatures 11.13 Remark (a particular class of message recovery schemes)§1.8.3 describes a class of dig- ital signature schemes with message recovery which arise from reversible public-key en- cryption methods. Examples include the RSA (§8.2) and Rabin (§8.3) encryption schemes. Thecorrespondingsignaturemechanismsare discussed in§11.3.1 and§11.3.4,respectively. 11.14 Note (signatures with appendix from schemes providing message recovery) Any digital signature scheme with message recovery can be turned into a digital signature scheme with appendix by simply hashing the message and then signing the hash value. The message is now required as input to the verification algorithm. A schematic for this situation can be derived from Figure 11.3 and is illustrated in Figure 11.4. The redundancy function R is no longer critical to the security of the signature scheme, and can be any 1 − 1 function from M h to M S . R M R M S S A,k m s ∗ = S A,k ( m) M h M m h h(m) S Figure 11.4: Signature scheme with appendix obtained from one providing message recovery. 11.2.4 Types of attacks on signature schemes The goal of an adversary is to forge signatures; that is, produce signatures which will be accepted as those of some other entity. The following provides a set of criteria for what it means to break a signature scheme. 1. total break. An adversary is either able to compute the private key information of the signer, or finds an efficient signing algorithm functionally equivalent to the valid signing algorithm. (For example, see §11.3.2(i).) 2. selective forgery. An adversary is able to create a valid signature for a particular mes- sage or class of messages chosen a priori. Creating the signature does not directly involve the legitimate signer. (See Example 11.21.) 3. existential forgery. An adversary is able to forge a signature for at least one mes- sage. The adversary has little or no control over the message whose signature is ob- tained, and the legitimate signer may be involved in the deception (for example, see Note 11.66(iii)). There are two basic attacks against public-key digital signature schemes. 1. key-only attacks. In these attacks, an adversary knows only the signer’s public key. 2. message attacks. Here an adversary is able to examine signatures corresponding ei- ther to known or chosen messages. Message attacks can be further subdivided into three classes: (a) known-messageattack. Anadversaryhas signaturesfora set ofmessageswhich are known to the adversary but not chosen by him. c 1997 by CRC Press, Inc. — See accompanying notice at front of chapter. § 11.3 RSA and related signature schemes 433 (b) chosen-message attack. An adversary obtains valid signatures from a chosen list of messages before attempting to break the signature scheme. This attack is non-adaptive in the sense that messages are chosen before any signatures are seen. Chosen-message attacks against signature schemes are analogous to chosen-ciphertext attacks against public-key encryption schemes (see §1.13.1). (c) adaptivechosen-messageattack. An adversary is allowed to use the signer as an oracle; the adversary may request signatures of messages which depend on the signer’s public key and he may request signatures of messages which depend on previously obtained signatures or messages. 11.15 Note (adaptivechosen-messageattack) In principle, an adaptive chosen-message attack is the most difficult type ofattack to prevent. It is conceivablethatgivenenoughmessagesand correspondingsignatures,an adversary could deduce a pattern and then forge a signatureof its choice. While an adaptive chosen-message attack may be infeasible to mount in prac- tice, a well-designed signature scheme should nonetheless be designed to protect against the possibility. 11.16 Note (security considerations) The level of security required in a digital signature scheme mayvaryaccordingtotheapplication. For example, in situationswherean adversaryis only capable of mounting a key-only attack, it may suffice to design the scheme to prevent the adversary from being successful at selective forgery. In situations where the adversary is capable of a message attack, it is likely necessary to guard against the possibility of exis- tential forgery. 11.17 Note (hash functions and digital signature processes) When a hash function h is used in a digital signature scheme (as is often the case), h should be a fixed part of the signature process so that an adversary is unable to take a valid signature, replace h with a weak hash function, and then mount a selective forgery attack. 11.3 RSA and related signature schemes This section describes the RSA signature scheme and other closely related methods. The security of the schemes presented here relies to a large degree on the intractability of the integer factorization problem (see§3.2). The schemes presented include both digital signa- tures with message recovery and appendix (see Note 11.14). 11.3.1 The RSA signature scheme The message space and ciphertext space for the RSA public-key encryption scheme (§8.2) are both Z n = {0, 1, 2, . ,n− 1} where n = pq is the product of two randomly chosen distinct prime numbers. Since the encryption transformation is a bijection, digital signa- turescan be created by reversingthe rolesof encryptionanddecryption. The RSA signature scheme is a deterministic digital signature scheme which provides message recovery (see Definition 11.7). The signing spaceM S and signature space S are both Z n (see Table 11.1 for notation). A redundancy function R : M−→Z n is chosen and is public knowledge. Handbook of Applied Cryptography by A. Menezes, P. van Oorschot and S. Vanstone. . including authenti- cation, data integrity, and non-repudiation. One of the most significant applications of dig- ital signatures is the certification of public. Signature Algo- rithm (DSA) and ElGamal schemes, are the topic of §11.5. One-time signature schemes, many of which arise from symmetric-key cryptography,

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Generate time = 0.102024078369 s. Memory usage = 13.96 MB